Hanna Sheehy Skeffington 1877-1946

Hanna Sheehy Skeffington

Johanna Sheehy was born in Kanturk County Cork in 1877. Her father was a nationalist MP for South Galway. David Sheehy was imprisoned many times for his part in the Land War. Hanna was educated in Eccles St, Dublin. She later went on to St Mary’s University obtaining her degree from the Royal University of Ireland.

In 1920, she achieved a first class honours MA. She became a teacher in Eccles St and later taught French and German in Rathmines College of Commerce. In 1903 she married Francis Skeffington, a university registrar, Francis was totally committed to equality and, very unusually for the time, took Hanna’s surname.


In 1912, she and her husband founded the Irish Citizen.
During the Rising, Hanna brought food to the different outposts and Frank tried to set up a citizen’s militia to stop looting. He was arrested by the British authorities and shot on the orders of Captain Bowen-Colthurst. Bowen-Colthurst was found ‘guilty but insane’ at his court martial. Hanna refused the compensation and insisted on an inquiry into his death.

At the end of 1916 Hanna travelled to the US and spoke at 250 meetings across the continent. Her tour raised $40,000, which was handed over to Michael Collins. Forbidden by the Government to return to Ireland Hanna smuggled herself in via Liverpool in 1918, but she was soon detained and imprisoned in Holloway Jail along with Kathleen Clarke, Maude Gonne and Countess Markievicz. During the War of Independence, she was active in Sinn Féin. In 1920 she was elected to Dublin Corporation.
1926 Hanna supported Eamon de Valera during the Sinn Féin split and joined Fianna Fáil.

Hanna died on Easter Saturday, 20 April 1946.

She really deserves to be looked up if you have read this far as her life and achievements deserve a website onto themselves.  The images are part of a series of works entitled ‘Something to Live for’ at Parliament Street, Cork Hill, Dame Street Dublin.  1916 One hundred website

 

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The Cutlers, Thomas Reads, in miniature by Tom Hudson

The Cutlers, Thomas Reads, Parliament Street Dublin

The Cutlers, Thomas Reads, Parliament Street Dublin – Miniature model by Tom Hudson

Reads LH window

The genius of the visual literature of miniature. After years of vigilance regarding the protection and preservation of Thomas Reads, The Cutlers in Parliament Street, a building loved by Dubliners and the world over, of all the things to fall into my lap and hands, these photos of Tom Hudson’s miniature models of Thomas Reads in around the early 1970tys are certainly the most wondrous and precious.

Fantastic to have confirmed that actual models in these photos are still in existence in the hands of a collector (Charles Dudley) of Tom Hudson’s works.

 

Here is vanished history in great detail rendered back for today’s society.  How important are these works is anyone’s guess.  But the fact that they are here I’m sure is going to be to everybody’s delight.  Take a closer look and enter the window of Thomas Reads for a true bit of window shopping into the past. Notice the matchbox and its size and then you get a sense of scale of the detail. James Joyce would be proud.  As they say, you can rebuild Dublin from Ulysses but here is certainly one of its oldest shops, actualized in miniature in extraordinary detail.  As alive now as ever it was.

Reads RH window

Reads Right Hand Window in miniature

Reads door

Doors of Thomas Reads, in miniature

Press Release from owner of Thomas Reads, The Cutlers

Please see Press Release attached from the owners of Thomas Read’s, Ireland’s Oldest Shop. See also this link http://thegentlemansoldier.com/Thomas-Read-of-Dublin.html for additional information.

10th March 2014

Reeds, Number 4 Parliament Street, Dublin 2

 

In response to and clarification of RTE’s Morning Ireland coverage on 7th March 2014

 Background

No 4 Parliament Street is a private property owned by a private individual who having acquired the building two years ago, wishes to restore the property to its original status as a cutlery shop and as a private home.

The owner’s interest is in the conservation not renovation of both the building and the original shop.

It is not going to be developed nor refurbished, no change of use is planned and the business is to be reopened.

The owner has invested considerable time and resources in the conservation and restoration of the building over the last two years, including the following:

  • A world renowned author on history of the family, its business and the store.
  • A senior archivist was appointed to archive thousands of the products and materials found within the building.
  • All works to date including the archiving have been photographed and filmed for future publication.

With regard to the issue of the building being closed to the public:

 The building has been closed for almost 20 years.

The owner has appointed Kelly and Cogan Conservation Architects and has completed a considerable amount of conservation research into the building and over the last year, With the assistance of Dublin City Council, have already and continue to implement maintenance repair and conservation work . This work might not be highly visible but it is absolutely critical and ongoing.

 

Given the nature of the work it is expected that the building work will not be completed, subject to planning for at least 18 months.

–       ends –

Any questions relating to the architecture please contact:

Mr James Kelly RIAI RIBA

Kelly and Cogan

Architects and Design Consultants

81 North King Street

Smithfield

Dublin 7

Tel:   01 8721295

Fax:  01 8747476

The Oldest Shop in Dublin, 4 Parliament Street

sword wall

This building was sold over a year ago.  Prior to that it had been closed to the public for almost 10 years.  When I lived over Thomas Reads I kept my eye on the building and the flooding that was taking place at the back of the premises.  A lot of work was done to divert the water into Crane lane and I have been into this premises ‘The Cutlers’ on many occasions over the past few years, making sure the cabinets and interiors were still on the premises and not getting damaged. Those artifacts should be immediately handed over to the care of the relevant conservationists for safe keeping.

They include the historical ledgers, silverware and some beautiful cabinets.  There were many attempts by local individuals to acquire this premises from the agents and receivers but to no avail. I personally tried to get Dublin City Council to acquire the premises with the help of the conservation section of DCC.  I felt that this building gave an enormous cultural credibility to the Temple Bar area not to forget that it was on this roof and adjoining roof of 3 Parliament St,  that one of the first teenagers was shot and killed in the 1916 rebellion.  Joe Duffy has written extensively and expertly on this matter.

Indeed the new owner of Thomas Reads public house itself and the Oak Bar, I believe, would be very interested in restoring this premises and also that would keep it open to the public.  The premises extends right into Crane Lane and it is a must see even in its present dilapidated state.  The Cutlers themselves supplied many a sword to the Dublin gentry as well as the English gentry who visited.  They could even be regarded as an armourer.  Indeed the whole street Parliament Street is an ideal street along with Capel Street for  a total upgrade and a bit of nurture.  To get the picture one needs to view these streets from the windows of the City Hall Chambers where you can get the view of the upper architectural features and streetscape with a spectacular view as far down as Bolton Street.

Its grand and easy to wax lyrically about Merrion Square, Mountjoy Square but the likes of Parliament Street and Capel Street could crumble to dust if we don’t start caring as citizens about our built environment. What is an enormous disgrace here is that this dilapidation happened right beside City Hall and I have raised the issue time and time again.  I got so concerned that I brought the conservation officers from DCC into the building early last year and got them to document every single item and fabric of the building.  They assured me that the building itself was a protected structure. (ref. 6322). I raised concerns before Christmas and I raised concerns over two months ago when I noticed that the front door could be pushed open and was not secured.

I really believe that this building should have been brought into the family of buildings under the charge of DCC but I have to ask what about the other buildings that DCC own that are as equally important that the city council have had for over 20 years that are in an appalling state? Henrietta Street is just one example.

The only solution is to be proactive and it is probably time for a new association or a new organisation along the lines of An Taisce, The Georgian Society and the Civic Trust thats 21st century to deal not just with the conservation and built heritage issues in Dublin but the issues throughout the country.

We need to get much more energized, politicized if we are to be effective.  We have to bring these buildings back into living use.  Everyday use.  For everyone. Buildings for the public to enjoy.

Here is DCC Conservation Officer reply to the present concerns regarding this building.

This building is included on the City Council’s Register of Protected Structures (ref. 6322). Under the provisions of Part IV of the Planning and Development Acts 2000 – 2013, responsibility for its maintenance and freedom from endangerment lies with the owner.

Two exemption certificates were granted for stated repair and maintenance works to the property, 4 Parliament Street   in October 2012, Reg reference 0140/12  was for  specified  works for  repair and maintenance works to the roof including repair to  rain water goods .This  work has  taken place. Prior to this , the owner had been actively working with the City Council and the Dept of AHG on a programme of works to progress the   opening of  the building as a shop with a residence overhead.

The weathering of the horizontal beam over the fascia signage needs to be attended to as a matter of urgency, and this has been  conveyed to the owner’s architect.

It should be noted that there are ongoing negotiations  taking place between the owner and the adjoining public house “Thomas Reads” .This relates to the  issue of  rainwater spilling from that premises into a void area of  number 4 Parliament Street.   This is a civil matter between the two owners .

Number 4 Parliament Street is currently unoccupied and a full internal and external inspection is being arranged with the owner. Any works required for the safety of the Building will be brought to the owner’s attention and  enforcement proceedings will be initiated if necessary.

 http://www.olddublintown.com/thomas-reads-1670.html

https://www.storehouse.co/stories/c8dv-selling-off-the-silverware