Bike Stuff n’ Gadgets awards

Five Smart Projects Receive Funding to Improve Cycling in Dublin

Dublin City Council and Enterprise Ireland announced the winners of the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) competition at The House of Lords, Bank of Ireland, College Green this evening.

The competition, which was launched by Smart Dublin last March, sought to find smart technology solutions to help improve and scale up cycling across Dublin. The challenge generated 98 expressions of interest, 23 proposals with 14 dragons den style pitches.

Five companies were selected to receive funding of up to €12,500 and supports from Dublin City Council to research and demonstrate the viability of their smart solution.

bicycle-keating

The chosen companies and their smart solutions are:

 

  • Ambie introducing BikeLook which monitors bicycle usage and deters and detects bicycle theft

 

  • Fluidedge introducing Liberty Bell, a bell that allows cyclists to record actual or perceived obstacles to aid safe cycling in Dublin

 

  • Hindnseek presents a low power device attached to a bicycle that generates real time data with can be integrated with other data sources

 

  • Limeforge Ltd. offers the See.Sense Tracker providing a ‘find your iphone’ like capability allowing cyclists to easily track their stolen bikes

 

  • M2C Smartcharge Ltd. introduces a tracking, logging and data harvesting system for use with bicycles in an urban area aiding the cyclist in predicting the ease of a journey, safety along the way and creating a secure parking facility and the end of the journey

 

Commenting at the announcement Dublin City Council’s Chief Executive, Owen Keegan said “A key aspect of our Smart Dublin initiative is to test new ways for the Dublin Local Authorities to pilot and understand the possibilities of using innovative technologies to solve city challenges.  We are genuinely impressed with the level of ideas that were presented through the SBIR process and look forward to working with these entrepreneurs to pilot and hopefully scale their products using Dublin as a test bed.”

Kevin Sherry, Divisional Manager, Enterprise Ireland commented “Enterprise Ireland is excited to work with Dublin City Council on this initiative, and we congratulate the phase one winners on their innovative solutions which will improve the cycling experience and safety of bicycle users in urban areas.”

David Timoney, Dublin Cycling Campaign who are supporting the initiative added “There are real opportunities to use these new low cost innovations to better understand cycling patterns and experiences.  This in turn will allow for more evidence based decisions by the City on cycling infrastructure. The data will hopefully strengthen the already strong arguments for increased transport spends on cycling.  Furthermore solutions to address cycle theft in Dublin through smart tracker devices have the potential to dramatically reduce bike theft levels currently estimated at a staggering €20,000 per annum in Dublin alone.”

The companies have three months to develop their solution to pre-prototype stage, after which some will be selected for further funding (up to €25,000 each) to complete their prototype solutions.

ENDS

 For further information contact:

Jamie Cudden, Smart City Programme Manager, Dublin City Council M 087 783 5411

Notes to the Editor:

Details of the successful proposals are:

Ambie: BikeLook is a smart city solution to monitor bicycle usage and to deter and detect bicycle theft. Using low power radio (Bluetooth Smart) to track bicycles in the city. Bluetooth trackers’ effectiveness is usually limited by the radio range between the sensor and a mobile phone, but through strategic location of listening posts at bicycle parking, junctions and on street sweepers, the opportunity exists to monitor the volume and direction of cycle traffic in the city.

 

Fluidedge: ‘Liberty Bell’ – A smart bicycle bell that allow citizens who cycle record actual or perceived obstacles to safe cycling in Dublin. Hotspots are highlighted in real-time and authorities are alerted to poor road conditions or poor behaviour by other road users.

 

Hidnseek: A low power device attached to a bicycle that has the ability to generate real time data which can be integrated with existing data sources and information to create an overall accurate picture of the cycling experience in Dublin. The device can measure GPS co-ordinates, speed and environmental conditions using the low cost sigfox network.

 

Limeforge Ltd – See.Sense: The See.Sense Tracker will provide a ‘find your iphone’ like capability using LPWA and GPS, allowing cyclists to easily track their stolen bike anywhere across the city. At the same time, our patent-pending use of sensor technology enables the crowd sourcing of real-time data about cyclist’s journeys over a wide range of variables. Two variants will be created – one for use on personal bikes and one for integration into city bikes alongside our ICON intelligent bike light.

 

M2C Smartcharge Ltd: A tracking, logging and data harvesting system for use with bicycles in a metropolitan area. The system will endeavour to aid the cyclist in predicting the ease of a journey (front end), safety along the way with geographic analysis (Journey Safety) and create a secure parking facility at the end of the journey (destination management)

_________________________________

 

Smart Dublin is an initiative of the four Dublin Local Authorities to engage with smart technology providers, researchers and citizens to solve city challenges and improve city life.

 

Enterprise Ireland is the government organisation responsible for the development and growth of Irish enterprises in world markets. It supports sustainable economic growth, regional development and secure employment.

 

Dublin Cycling Campaign The Dublin Cycling Campaign is an independent, voluntary cycling advocacy group that has been working to improve the city for all cyclists since 1993 www.dublincycling.ie

 

What is Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR)? SBIR refers to the public procurement of research and development on new innovative solutions before they are commercially available. It involves different suppliers competing through different phases of development, while the risks and benefits are shared between the procurers and the suppliers under market conditions.

An tAthair Pádraig Ó Fiannachta -Oidhreacht

Tonight celebrate Culture Night and those who make it.

I was privileged to know, and have some of my work translated by, the magnificent Irish scholar, priest, poet, publisher and sage Pádraig O Fiannachta.  His cultural breath still breathes on this great land of ours and its influence gives life throughout the cultural world.

The text below is a translation from our 2006 work ‘Letting Go of That which you most Ardently Desire’ an artwork that dealt with the issue of armed struggle in Irish history and our recent decommissioning process.

An tAthair O Fiannachta passed away in July of this year into the mythical.

                                                  Ní fheicimíd a leithéid arís ann

gunbutts                                      

 

  The Grip That Binds Us

As human beings we are constantly trying to deal and come to terms with internalised trauma.  Being unable or unwilling to resolve certain issues, we cling even tighter to them and, though we yearn for peace and rest and progress, we can’t seem to let go of that which threatens to destroy us.

What is it like to walk away from conflict, to put your weapons beyond use?  To dwell upon all the years committed to the never ending cycle of fright, fight, flight.  Resentment, hatred, fury and denial all form part of the energy field that has dominated us human beings for thousands of years.
Along with the hardware, these emotions need to be deactivated if the grip that has bound us for generations to armed conflict is to be loosened finally and permanently.

Letting go is always a process of loss, a process of grieving. The dawning realisation that you cannot retake what you’ve reconciled to let go of.  And the final, slow acceptance that it is no longer of service to you anyway.
The grip that binds us is a reflective process which offers participants a chance to engage with the emotional dynamics  that underlie letting go and the emergence of something new.

© Gerard Mannix Flynn

Glas-snaidhm orainn

Bímid, mar dhaoine daonna, de shíor ar gor ar chréachtaí inmheánaithe, agus ag iarraidh bheith réidh leo. Toisc nach féidir linn, nó nach toil linn, fadhbanna áirithe a réiteach, is daingne fós ár ngreim orthu; cé go mbímid ag tnúth le síocháin, le suaimhneas agus le dul chun cinn, ní bhíonn ar ár gcumas, de réir dealraimh, scaradh leis an rud seo a bhíonn á bhagairt sinn a scrios.

Conas a mhothaíonn sé cúl a thabhairt le coimhlint, d’airm a chur ó mhaith?
Bheith ag cuimhneamh gan stad ar na blianta gan áireamh gafa ag sceon agus comhrac, tóir agus teitheamh, teitheamh agus tóir.
Tá fuath agus fíoch, fearg agus faltanas i réim i ngarraí treafa polaitíochta Éireann leis na cianta cairbreacha.

Ní hiad na hairm chogaidh amháin atá le cur ó mhaith agus le scrios ach freisin na mothúcháin úd go léir a nasc sinn, glúin ar ghlúin, le cogaíocht an ghunna – táid le scaoileadh go deo faoi dheireadh thiar thall.

Is geall le cailliúint, le caoineadh, i gcónaí rud a scaoileadh uait. Tuigeann tú de réir a chéile nach féidir leat greim a fháil go deo arís ar an rud ar ar réitigh tú scaradh leis. Glacann tú leis de réir a chéile nach aon tairbhe duit é cibé scéal é.

An glas-snaidhm a cheanglaíonn sinn, is próiséas meabhrach é a thugann caoi dóibh siúd a bhíonn páirteach ann dul i ngleic leis na fórsaí mothaithe is bonn don scaoileadh ar shiúl agus do shaolú na nua-bhreithe.

© Gerard Mannix Flynn
Aistriúcháin – Fr. Pádraig Ó Fiannachta

 

 

Disruption of Water Supply – Saturday

Disruption of Water Supply – Dublin  – Saturday 28th May, 2016.

Please see list of areas affected below:

Dublin City Council, working on behalf of Irish Water, advises that, while a repair is being carried out on a large water main, there will be reduced pressures and possible temporary loss of water supply in parts of the city from 08.00am until midnight on Saturday 28th May, 2016. The areas likely to be affected are:

 

Chapelizod, Islandbridge, Infirmary Road, Phoenix Park, Oxmanstown Road, Prussia Street, Grangegorman, Arbour Hill, Phibsborough Road, Broadstone, Constitution Hill and surrounding areas, as shown in the shaded area on the attached map.

 

Dublin City Council will make a number of water tankers available on the day.

The daytime contact telephone number for Saturday is 01 8643634.

After 17:00 hrs the contact number is 01 6796186.

 

Map available at: http://www.dublincity.ie/sites/default/files/content/Press/Documents/islandbridge.pdf

 

Conflict + the City – Free talks

Some of you might be interested in this two day conference at Liberty Hall. The event is free but you must register through the email at the bottom of this press release.  It is a public event and open to all.

31st May-June 1st 

List of speakers can be found here: http://conflictandthecity.ie/speakers/

 

CONFLICT + THE CITY – Public Conference in Liberty Hall Theatre  (FREE)

City Wall CHAPTER 5-700x572Dublin City Council’s Heritage Office, in conjunction with UCD Decade of Centenaries, is organising a two-day Public Conference entitled‘Conflict + The City’ in Liberty Hall Theatre. The Conference is aimed at the general public and admission is free.

Over the two days speakers will engage with the audience in discussing the effect of war on the streets and buildings of cities, the rebuilding that then happens and how this affects the way we experience our cities today. Day one will mostly concentrate on Dublin post-rebellion (and post-1922) and then broaden out to look at major cities across Europe with international speakers focusing on Beirut and Berlin. Day two will look at Jerusalem, Belfast, Sarajevo, and the contemporary situation in Calais, for examples.

Speaking about the conference, Charles Duggan, Heritage Officer with Dublin City Council said “This conference is designed for the general public, for anyone who has an interest in Dublin and how the city was rebuilt after the conflicts that took place from 1916 to 1922. But as well as that, we will be placing Dublin in a greater European context and looking at the effect of conflicts on other great European cities. A host of International speakers, together with local experts will deliver talks on an aspect of the city that has yet to be explored.”

Dr. Ellen Rowley of UCD said “Staying in the twentieth century, this two-day public conference will present research into various architectures of war and cities in repair, from Beirut to Blitz-time London; from Cold War bunkers to Belfast’s peace-lines. Today, in Dublin, much of how we move through, spend time in and experience the city comes out of the 1920s reconstruction projects. The scars of conflict and the efforts towards rebuilding resonate through Dublin’s architecture, almost 100 years later.”

ENDS

The conference is free but booking is essential.

For more information see W: www.conflictandthecity.ie

E: heritage@dublincity.ie T: (01) 222 3090

 

Women of 1916- Áine Ceannt

The images on this site are from our installation ‘Something to Live for’ situated over the Ivy on Parliament Street and Dame Street Dublin.  The work was first installed in 2006 and has been reinstated for 2016.

Aine Ceannt

Áine Ceannt (née Brennan) – Something to Live For

 

Áine Ceannt (née Brennan)  1880-1954

Frances O’Brennan is best known by her married name, Áine Ceannt, as the widow of Eamonn Ceannt, one of the leaders of the 1916 Rising.

Frances was born on 23 September 1880, four months after the death of her father, Frank O’Brennan. Elizabeth Butler, Fanny’s mother got a job as a nurse in a workhouse after her husband’s death.

At the turn of the century Fanny joined the Gaelic League and, like many of the other women who became interested in the Irish language, she adopted an Irish name, Áine.  It was in the Gaelic League that she met Eamonn Ceannt. Their first encounter was on an annual excursion to Galway in 1901.  The couple married on 7th June 1905.  Their son Rónán was born on 18th  June 1906. Eamonn worked in the Dublin Corporation.  By 1916, he was the assistant to the City Treasurer and commanded a substantial salary.  He was a committed nationalist; in 1913, he joined the Irish Volunteers as a Private and rose to the rank of Captain.  He was in charge of the South Dublin Union garrison in 1916.

Just before his execution on 8th May 1916, Eamonn Ceannt wrote a last letter to his wife: ‘My dearest wife Áine. Not wife but widow before these lines reach you….Dearest ‘silly little Fanny’ My poor little sweetheart of – how many – years ago…Ever my comforter, God comfort you now.  What can I say? I die a noble death, for Ireland’s freedom…You will be – you are, the wife of one of the Leaders of the Revolution.  Sweeter still you are my little child, my dearest pet, my sweetheart of the hawthorn hedges and Summer’s ever….’

Like many of the other widows, Áine moved into a public role following the Rising. She had been a member of Cumann na mBan from its inception and her sister Lily, was in the Marrowbone Lane garrison. Áine served as vice-president of Cumann na mBan from 1917-1925.  In 1918 she contested the elections for the Urban District Council of Rathmines and was vice-chairman for a period.  During the years 1920-21, she acted as a District Justice in the republican courts in the Dublin suburbs of Rathmines and Rathgar. During the War of Independance, she sheltered men on the run; one of the many who stayed with her was Robert Barton.  She also acted as an arbitrator for the Labour Department of Dáil Éireann in wage disputes throughout the country.

In 1920, she became the founding member of the Irish White Cross allocating funds for the benefit of orphans of wars in Ireland.  By 1941 the office had closed but Áine archived all the papers and wrote a history of the White Cross from 1920-1947. 

From 1939-1947 she was a member of the Red Cross.  Mine died in February 1954. Her funeral took place in her local parish in Dundrum, County Dublin and she was buried in Deansgrange cemetery.

From the installation ‘Something to Live for’ Parliament St/Dame St Dublin by Farcry Productions Ltd.

http://www.1916onehundred.ie

Hanna Sheehy Skeffington 1877-1946

Hanna Sheehy Skeffington

Johanna Sheehy was born in Kanturk County Cork in 1877. Her father was a nationalist MP for South Galway. David Sheehy was imprisoned many times for his part in the Land War. Hanna was educated in Eccles St, Dublin. She later went on to St Mary’s University obtaining her degree from the Royal University of Ireland.

In 1920, she achieved a first class honours MA. She became a teacher in Eccles St and later taught French and German in Rathmines College of Commerce. In 1903 she married Francis Skeffington, a university registrar, Francis was totally committed to equality and, very unusually for the time, took Hanna’s surname.


In 1912, she and her husband founded the Irish Citizen.
During the Rising, Hanna brought food to the different outposts and Frank tried to set up a citizen’s militia to stop looting. He was arrested by the British authorities and shot on the orders of Captain Bowen-Colthurst. Bowen-Colthurst was found ‘guilty but insane’ at his court martial. Hanna refused the compensation and insisted on an inquiry into his death.

At the end of 1916 Hanna travelled to the US and spoke at 250 meetings across the continent. Her tour raised $40,000, which was handed over to Michael Collins. Forbidden by the Government to return to Ireland Hanna smuggled herself in via Liverpool in 1918, but she was soon detained and imprisoned in Holloway Jail along with Kathleen Clarke, Maude Gonne and Countess Markievicz. During the War of Independence, she was active in Sinn Féin. In 1920 she was elected to Dublin Corporation.
1926 Hanna supported Eamon de Valera during the Sinn Féin split and joined Fianna Fáil.

Hanna died on Easter Saturday, 20 April 1946.

She really deserves to be looked up if you have read this far as her life and achievements deserve a website onto themselves.  The images are part of a series of works entitled ‘Something to Live for’ at Parliament Street, Cork Hill, Dame Street Dublin.  1916 One hundred website

 

frontview1

 

Devious Poster Theft

posterpole

 

It appears that there is a group of individuals going around in a white van with high-vis jackets on removing our posters.

We received a call last night to say that someone had seen them in broad daylight taking the posters. We were at the DCC Rathmines depot this morning and they had only one of our posters taken in. We have taken a look around the city and a lot of our posters are missing from the poles they were placed on.
This is anti democratic and completely wrong. We ask whoever is doing this to stop.
I’d also ask the members of the public to be vigilant. The Dublin City Council litter wardens will have DCC ID on them and the DCC logo on the back of their jackets.
To those taking down the posters, be assured, we will be replacing them over the next 24 hours.

 

 

 

 

Voting Register Closes Feb 9th 5pm

Are you registered to vote?

 SUPPLEMENTARY REGISTER CLOSES ON TUESDAY 9TH FEB AT 5PM (Dublin City Council)

Dublin City Council is asking voters to check immediately if they are registered to vote on the Register of Electors, so that they can be sure of having their say and vote in the forthcoming general election.

 The Register of Electors 2016-2017 was published on the 1st February 2016 and is on display at Dublin City Council offices, Garda Stations, Libraries, Post Offices and online at www.checktheregister.ie . If you are aged 18 or over, check that your name, address and details are correct on the Register.

Mr. Vincent Norton, Executive Manager, Dublin City Council says, “I would strongly advise people to make sure they are registered now to avoid disappointment as past experience has shown that many eligible people lost their chance to vote by simply not checking the register. I would encourage all who are eligible to vote to check the website immediately and to register with your local authority, to be included on the

Supplementary Register.  Postal applications must be received by 5pm Friday, 5thFebruary 2016 and the Supplementary Register will close on Tuesday 9th February 2016, 5pm deadline”.

 To be eligible to vote in this election one must be an Irish citizen or a British citizen resident in Ireland.

 Forms are available to download directly from the Dublin City Council website

www.dublincity.ie/YourCouncil/VotingandElections  or you can contact the Franchise Section Tel 222 5010.

Unique Dublin Artefact – John ffrench/Mirolo Mosaic

 

Mosaic_Mirolo

Mosaic in Boyers Restaurant, Dublin by John ffrench Irish Artist installed by Joe and David Mirolo – (The work is signed 1967)

Boyers of Earl Street is closing its doors for good.  Generations passed through these doors and the place is a wash with memory.  It is important to keep that connection to that memory, to that heritage, to that witness.
In the restaurant of Boyers is a mosaic artwork that many Dubliners over the generations enjoyed.  Too much of this unique work has been previously lost to skips and landfill.  Too many of our unique buildings, streets, have been simply bulldozed and replaced by ugly shopping centres or even uglier office blocks.  A thing of beauty is a joy forever.  This work was installed by Joe and David Mirolo an Italian-Irish family who made a cultural contribution through their trade to this city and indeed to this country.  This is multi-culturalism.  This artwork is the evidence and we must save this artefact, conserve and protect it for the joy and education of future generations. We cannot lose it or let it be taken away.
The Little Museum of Dublin would be an ideal place for this work to be represented and presented back to the Dublin people or any other similar place like it.  Indeed, I would go so far as to say that the North side of Dublin needs its own Little Museum of Dublin. We didn’t save Wood Quay in the past or the Quays.  Much of Dublin has been destroyed despite our cries – surely we can save this fine piece of Italian-Irish heritage? #loveculture
About the Mirolo family:
Guiseppe Mirolo came to Dublin in the 1930s, before the First World War he was studying medicine but that was all to change. He served his apprenticeship with artisans from his home region of Friuli in Northern Italy, he was also a ‘profigi’ or in modern terms a refugee. He worked hard to create a good life for his family and loved Dublin.
Some of his work survives in Dublin and in Christ the King Cathedral and the mosaic’s in Mullingar. The Harp on the steps of Walton’s Music Shop on North Frederick Street is his. The floor of the iconic Waldorf Barbershop is his floor.  The Mirolo family have been involved in Terrazzo & Mosaic for four generations now.
About the artist John ffrench:

John ffrench was born in Dublin to Irish and Italian parents. Travel and foreign inspiration has always been a factor in his work. His early art education was in design, drawing and calligraphy in the National College of Art in Dublin. In 1951, ffrench went to the Institute Statale d´Arte in Florence to study under professor Bruno Pauli. He stayed on in Italy until 1955 to work with like-minded ceramicists on one-off pieces and to soak up the innovations of Italian Modernism. The Mediterranean influence, so apparent in his work from then on, set him apart on his return to Ireland. At this time, Ireland had virtually no craft pottery tradition and mass produced and imported work was standard. Even in the 1950´s, the new craft schools based on the Bernard Leach school favoured the Anglo-Oriental style of dun-coloured pots, the “little brown pots” as they were known.

When ffrench returned to Ireland in 1956 he set up the ‘Ring Studio´ in Kilkenny with Peter Brennan. He began to create pots unlike any seen previously in the country; ffrench preferred to hand build rather than throw his pots and they were very sculptural and experimental in form. The cubist paintings of Picasso and Braque inspired both the ceramics and paintings he made at this time and much of his work was large and irregularly shaped (to the point that his work was described as “too obstinately asymmetrical” by a Dublin newspaper).

In 1962, ffrench returned to Ireland and founded the Arklow Studio Pottery. The Scandinavian Report into the status and quality of craft in Ireland had been scathing, a government initiative to improve standards by involving experts in the various fields was set up. Ffrench was closely involved in this capacity with Kilkenny Studios, which was producing designers for various industries. Influences from his time spent in India were seen in the imagery, colour, form and pattern work of his time. The studio produced tableware, pots, jewellery, wall panels in colourfully glazed, stamped and gilded finishes. In 1969, he moved to America and opened the Dolphin Studio in Massachusetts. With his wife he added batik works and silk-screen prints to his range. He made cheerfully coloured decorative temples and mythical buildings made from individual tiles and arranged like children´s building blocks. In 2007, John ffrench was honoured with a lifetime achievement show from the Arts Council of Ireland.

A Grandiose Conference of Indifference

photo-18

 

This opinion is meant in the best possible constructive taste and one should take it without the fear of uncomfortability.  If we are not challenged and open to challenge and if we are not uneasy, well that is a very unhealthy place to be. Honesty is the order of the day. 

Hidden Rooms or Hidden agenda? Collaboration or evasion? Inclusion or exclusion? What difference? DCC’s A Different Conference or a conference of gobbledygook.

November 25th to 26th A conference on the future of the City has been taking place in and around Dublin’s City centre.

How out of touch can Dublin City Council be from its homeless people  is evident in the laissez faire expenditure in this Pivot project. One can only coin the phrase

‘City Manager, City Manager,the people of Dublin are homeless’ and his reply is ‘Let them have Pivot, let them have conferences on City living’.

You cannot justify not being able to maintain the basic needs of people’s housing i.e. fixing a broken window for a senior citizen, or housing a homeless family, by this elite gathering of elites to simply waffle on about their grand designs.

As a Councillor and a Dubliner, in my opinion, to conduct these conferences in light of the above and to continue with the failed Pivot bid and its program is nothing short of shamelessness and indifference to the poor of our city.  One has only got to look at the line up of guest speakers and participants to see the usual wafflers offering their tuppence worth of what has already been well discussed and well ironed out in other cities.  All they are doing is an act of plagiarism. There is nothing original here.  It is simply grand standing of personalities before any principal or consideration of the ethical implications of wasting such scarce financial resources when they had better been spent on maintaining and housing our homeless and looking after our elderly and needy.

Its quite obvious that this is a pet project centered around self promotion and is substanceless no doubt we will get the booklet and the DVD on how marvelous the whole event was.  Like the many other DVDs and catalogues we have gotten over the years.

You cannot justify this for one moment when there are hundreds of children homeless this very day.  If you want to do something with the kind of money that you are so loose with, the public purse, spend it on the public’s poor and not on your well off selves.  Possibly spend some of your own money on this, you might be a bit more prudent and reckless rather than the complete waste of scarce resources of the finances of City Council.

All of these issues have been driven in the Dublin City Council Development plan, the local area plans so on and so forth. They were even discussed in the SDZ Docklands plans and the Grangegorman plans.  Lets face it folks, this is more naval gazing and it is highly unlikely that anything, other than more grandiosity, will emerge from this.

Spend the money on the citizens who need it most.  Spend the money on making children safe tonight but stop this nonsense, this indifference, to the public purse and the people of the city.  This is designed entirely for a professional ruling class elite so as they can all slap each other on the back and I know you know, from the many that I spoke with over the conference, that there is great uncomfortability and uneasiness about this rather surreal event given what’s going on outside of the doors and out on the streets outside City Hall.

photo-19Nothing to smile about with this expenditure #hiddenhouse 
Question to the Chief Executive Council Meeting 03 November 2014

Q.159 COUNCILLOR MANNIX FLYNN

Can the Chief Executive issue a full report with regards to PIVOT and the bid for design capital.  This report to include how much was spent on the bid for design capital and what was the allocation an expenditure of PIVOT.  Also what are the future plans for this initiative and what its achievements to date are.

 CHIEF EXECUTIVE’S REPLY:

Report on the PIVOT Dublin initiative and the bid for World Design Capital 2014, allocation and expenditure, achievements to date and future plans for the initiative.

PIVOT Dublin is an initiative to promote the use of design as a driver of social, cultural and economic development in the city. It has served as a means of promoting Dublin’s design businesses domestically and internationally, promoting Dublin’s attractiveness as a place to visit and do business and promoted greater public understanding of the role and potential of design as a means of effecting an improved quality of life in the city’s built environment.

The PIVOT Dublin initiative originated through the bid for World Design Capital 2014 which was run during 2010 and 2011. The bid was a joint initiative by Dublin City Council, Fingal County Council, South Dublin County Council and Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council. The following documents provide a full report on the bid:

 

  • World Design Capital 2014; The Potential for Dublin to mount a bid for the designation (2010)
  • Guide to the World Design Capital 2014 Bid (2011)
  • Guide to PIVOT Dublin (2012)

The expenditure for 2010 to 2011 on the bid for World Design Capital 2014 was as follows:

  • Overall expenditure on Bid (Dublin City Council, Fingal Co Council, Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown Co Council, Fáilte Ireland): €386,275

 

  • Dublin City Council expenditure (included in the above): €314,227

The allocation to PIVOT Dublin is made on the basis of a costed programme submitted in advance each year to the Chief Executive.